Category Archives: Kumite

Video: Renshu Ni Kumite

Renshu Kumite Ni is the second of two prearranged sequences (yakusoku randori kumite) developed by Hanshi Masayuki Kukan Hisataka to assist karatedo students to refine their favorite techniques into effective sequences utilizing both offensive and defensive strategies.

In fact, the two renshu kumite were created by Hanshi Hisataka in 1963, shortly after his arrival in New York, and stemmed from his observations after teaching classes of non-Japnese for the first time. He observed that, in general, western sports favored lateral motion over angular motion, and thus one of the prime aims of the renshu kumite ni is to emphasize angular motion.

An unique feature of the renshu kumite ni is that it was the first kumite created for the purpose of developing basic techniques used in competition. Prior to that time. kumite was the application of techniques from kata and the sankakutobi kumite. However, such application techniques were extremely intricate and more valuable in the development of real fighting strategies for life and death situations, as well as total physical, mental, and technical development. Renshu kumite ni (literally meaning kumite “practice”) is a scientifically developed fighting training method that can also serve as preparation for the higher level application kumite.

Renshu kumite ni emphasizes techniques of the rear hand and foot, as opposed to renshu kumite ichi, which emphasizes front hand and foot attacks. In addition, renshu kumite ni also emphasizes the succeeding step (tsugi ashi) and 45 degree angular motion. In effect, this implies escaping to the opponent’s blind spot and aids in deflecting the force of a direct attack. In this way, counterattacks are achieved in a circular motion. Accordingly, what commences as linear motion becomes angular motion, and finally, circular motion.

To practice renshu kumite ni, the karateka should bear in mind the intended target, the optimum technique, the manner of delivering that technique, the distance required to effectively deliver that technique, the timing required, and how to recover from the delivery. In this way, the karateka transcends mere technique and utilizes the three minds (mittsu no kokoro) of zenshin, tsushin and zanshin.

 

Video: Renshu Ichi Kumite

Both Renshu Kumite Ichi and Renshu Kumite Ni were developed by So Shihan Masayuki Hisataka in 1963 shortly after his arrival in New York and stemmed from his observation and teaching classes of non-Japanese for the first time. He observed that, in general, western sports favored lateral motion over angular motion and thus one of the prime aims of the Renshu Kumite Ni is to emphasize angular motion. The Renshu Kumite(s) contain most of the basic techniques and principles of Karatedo. Renshu Kumite Ichi emphasizes the use of the front hand and is recommended for 10th and 9th kyu students while Renshu Kumite Ni teaches the use of the back hand, and is recommended for 8th and 7th kyu students.

Video: Ten-Chi-Jin Kumite

The ten-chi-jin kumite are six basic attack and counter-attack sequences, three using hand techniques and three using foot techniques, which are designed to develop the ability to decide the correct distancing for a particular technique and also the most effective footwork to get close with that technique.

To achieve this, one hand sequence and one foot sequence are devoted to each of the three ranges: short, middle and long.

  1. For short range (chika ma), only the front foot is moved in offensive motions (fumikomi ashi) and only the back foot (hiki ashi) in defense.
  2. For middle range (chu kan), both feet are used in succession, with a forward sliding step (okuri ashi zenshin) for offense and a backward sliding step (okura ashi kotai) for defense.
  3. For long range (to ma) situations a combination of both short and middle range footwork is used with offensive movements using lunge steps (oi ashi), and defensive ones using receding steps (sagari ashi).

In additon, these kumite should be practiced to develop an understanding of the value of footwork (ashi sabaki), bodywork (tai sabaki), and handwork (te sabaki) for proper defense, especially using them to avoid counterattack.

The ten-ch-jin kumite were developed by So Shihan Masayuki Hisataka, Headmaster of Shorinjiryu Kenkokan, and are based on the concept of ten-chi-jin, or  the three level of life. Thus, the ultimate purpose of this kumite is to develop strategy, energy, and power from nature.

All hand sequences begin in left crane stance (hidari tsuru ashi dachi) with an upper-level guard (jodan kamae) with the left hand open and the right hand closed.

All leg sequences begin in a right crane stance (migi tsuru ashi dachi) with an upper-level guard (jodan Kamae) with the right hand open and the left hand closed.