Tag Archives: kumite

Video: Bunkai Kumite Bassai

Bunkai Kumite shows the hidden techniques within a kata. Movements that include unarmed techniques of strikes (goho) and locks (juho) as well as weapons application of the bo and katana (bukiho) are revealed. By its nature Bunkai kumite includes at least two players where one is the offensive player and one the defensive player. In team competition there are usually three players working together to show the inner workings of the kata. The offensive player(s) attacks the defensive player(s) with the kata movements in mind and the defensive player(s) uses the movements within the kata to determine an appropriate defensive response. The role of offense and defense may rotate between players so long as the movements of the kata are explored in sequence. Bunkai kumite is typically learned at the time when the underlying kata is well known and understood. The application of the Bunkai elevates the learning of the kata to a higher level and requires a more fluid understanding of the kata. In this respect Bunkai is typically practiced by intermediate to advanced students, however, the benefit of bunkai training can be obtained at any level with the proper instruction and guidance of a seasoned Sensei.

 

An example of Bunkai Kumite from the 2017 World Koshiki Tournament held in London, Ontario is shown below. Performing Bassai Bunkai is Shihan Andrew Riley, Kyoshi Nick King and Shihan Scott Chaffey. The trio won the gold medal for Bunkai. It was a great demonstration loved by the crowd.

Video: Renshu Ni Kumite

 

 

 

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Video: Renshu Ichi Kumite

Both Renshu Kumite Ichi and Renshu Kumite Ni were developed by So Shihan Masayuki Hisataka in 1963 shortly after his arrival in New York and stemmed from his observation and teaching classes of non-Japanese for the first time. He observed that, in general, western sports favored lateral motion over angular motion and thus one of the prime aims of the Renshu Kumite Ni is to emphasize angular motion. The Renshu Kumite(s) contain most of the basic techniques and principles of Karatedo. Renshu Kumite Ichi emphasizes the use of the front hand and is recommended for 10th and 9th kyu students while Renshu Kumite Ni teaches the use of the back hand, and is recommended for 8th and 7th kyu students.